Difference between revisions of "Privilege"

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==Etymology==
 
==Etymology==
 
Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin privilegium law for or against a private person, from privus private + leg-, lex law
 
Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin privilegium law for or against a private person, from privus private + leg-, lex law
*Date: [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12th_Century 12th century]
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*Date: [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/12th_Century 12th century]
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<center>For lessons on the related [[topic]] of '''''[[Leadership]]''''', follow [https://nordan.daynal.org/wiki/index.php?title=Category:Leadership '''''this link'''''].</center>
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==Definition==
 
==Definition==
* a [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rights right] or immunity granted as a peculiar benefit, advantage, or favor ; especially : such a right or immunity attached specifically to a position or an office
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* a [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rights right] or immunity granted as a peculiar benefit, advantage, or favor ; especially : such a right or immunity attached specifically to a position or an office
 
==Description==
 
==Description==
 
A '''privilege'''—etymologically "[[private]] [[law]]" or law relating to a specific [[individual]]—is a special entitlement or immunity granted by a [[government]] or other [[authority]] to a restricted [[group]], either by birth or on a conditional basis. A privilege can be revoked in some cases. In modern [[democracies]], a privilege is conditional and granted only after birth. By contrast, a right is an inherent, irrevocable entitlement held by all [[citizens]] or all [[human being]]s from birth. Miscellaneous privileges, e.g. the old common law privilege to title deeds, may still exist, though of little relevance today.[1]
 
A '''privilege'''—etymologically "[[private]] [[law]]" or law relating to a specific [[individual]]—is a special entitlement or immunity granted by a [[government]] or other [[authority]] to a restricted [[group]], either by birth or on a conditional basis. A privilege can be revoked in some cases. In modern [[democracies]], a privilege is conditional and granted only after birth. By contrast, a right is an inherent, irrevocable entitlement held by all [[citizens]] or all [[human being]]s from birth. Miscellaneous privileges, e.g. the old common law privilege to title deeds, may still exist, though of little relevance today.[1]
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In a broader sense, 'privilege' can refer to special [[powers]] or 'de facto' immunities held as a consequence of [[political]] power or [[wealth]]. Privilege of this sort may be transmitted by birth into a privileged class or achieved through individual [[actions]].  
 
In a broader sense, 'privilege' can refer to special [[powers]] or 'de facto' immunities held as a consequence of [[political]] power or [[wealth]]. Privilege of this sort may be transmitted by birth into a privileged class or achieved through individual [[actions]].  
  
One of the objectives of the [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Revolution French Revolution] was the abolition of privilege. This meant the removal of separate laws for different social classes (nobility, clergy and ordinary people), instead subjecting everyone to the same common law. Privileges were abolished by the National Constituent Assembly on August 4, 1789.
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One of the objectives of the [https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_Revolution French Revolution] was the abolition of privilege. This meant the removal of separate laws for different social classes (nobility, clergy and ordinary people), instead subjecting everyone to the same common law. Privileges were abolished by the National Constituent Assembly on August 4, 1789.
==Notes==
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==See also==
# Suzanna McNichol, The Law of Privilege (1st ed, 1992)
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*'''''[[Responsibility]]'''''
  
 
[[Category: General Reference]]
 
[[Category: General Reference]]

Latest revision as of 01:36, 13 December 2020

Lighterstill.jpg

Privilegecov2 2.jpg

Etymology

Middle English, from Anglo-French, from Latin privilegium law for or against a private person, from privus private + leg-, lex law



For lessons on the related topic of Leadership, follow this link.

Definition

  • a right or immunity granted as a peculiar benefit, advantage, or favor ; especially : such a right or immunity attached specifically to a position or an office

Description

A privilege—etymologically "private law" or law relating to a specific individual—is a special entitlement or immunity granted by a government or other authority to a restricted group, either by birth or on a conditional basis. A privilege can be revoked in some cases. In modern democracies, a privilege is conditional and granted only after birth. By contrast, a right is an inherent, irrevocable entitlement held by all citizens or all human beings from birth. Miscellaneous privileges, e.g. the old common law privilege to title deeds, may still exist, though of little relevance today.[1]

In a broader sense, 'privilege' can refer to special powers or 'de facto' immunities held as a consequence of political power or wealth. Privilege of this sort may be transmitted by birth into a privileged class or achieved through individual actions.

One of the objectives of the French Revolution was the abolition of privilege. This meant the removal of separate laws for different social classes (nobility, clergy and ordinary people), instead subjecting everyone to the same common law. Privileges were abolished by the National Constituent Assembly on August 4, 1789.

See also